FEATURED IN APRIL

URBAN HAIKU (WINTER) BY PAMELA STAKER

Pamela Staker's Urban Haiku switches up her normal uses of colors. In this work, there are predominant tones, but no predominant colors. Each stroke peeks out of other brushed moments. Her favorite violet is front and center, but it serves as a guideline rather than a form to be seen. In the background flat panes serve two purposes, wall and expanse. Differing from her larger pieces, the marks are more compact and thin, building a delicate composition. Pamela's painted meditation on urban forms masterfully captures the colors and chaos of city life.  

OBELIA MEDUSA BY NICHOLAS KRIEFALL

Nicholas Kriefall's poetic abstractions create worlds of cloudy colors. Balancing between an endless fall into darkness and euphoric brightness, Kriefall manages to create mildly textured deep abstractions that twist and wind like a Lewis Carol novel. His title's subject, the Obelia Medusa, is a very small predatory animal related to jellyfish. Medusa is a categorization of Obelia likely given because this form has many offshoots that look like the snaked head of the Greek monster Medusa. Whether one looks into this work as a reflecting pool, or an underwater world teeming with tiny animals, Kriefall's Obelia Medusa transports you to the worlds between myth and reality. 

SET OF CLAM CHAIRS BY PHILLIP ARCTANDER

These Clam Chairs have exploded in notoriety over the past few years. The frenzy started when a pair was misattributed to the phantom designer Martin Olsen. Previously unknown for his designs, Philip Arctander (1916-1994) was an independent architect in Copenhagen, Denmark. Though he is most well known for his role as the director of the Danish Building Research Institute, a few of his furniture designs persist through today, with the Clam Chair being most prevalent. Arctander's design combines a surreal playfulness with extreme comfort, and was decades ahead of its time when he first designed it. 

Matthew Ryan
Natural and Neutral

With spring blooming before our eyes, we thought it might be nice to select some pieces of our inventory that liven our spirits and make us think of the fresh air, great sunshine, and blossoming trees.


Wood

One of the great things about classic modern furniture is the patina their wood accrues over years of love and usage. Simultaneously hearty and rustic, wood plays nicely in any interior looking to add a touch of natural to its design.

Arthur Umanoff is known for his wrought iron, delicate wood constructions. This serving tray displays his unique sensibilities with wood. Made of Taverneau wood with reed handles, it is a simple and elegant accent to freshen up your living room or nightstand.

The Cleo Baldon Stools combine rich leather, metal, and wood for an angular barstool with a little bit of personality.

This Edward Wormley Mirror designed for Dunbar features thick glass with a mahogany frame, all parts are original from its production in the 1950s. Wood simply does not grow like this anymore, making this a one of a kind addition to your home.

Not all wood has to be brown though, our blue Hans Wegner Rocking Chair has a stained finish, allowing the original wood grain to show through while still having a vibrant tone to add contrast to your interiors. 

 

 

Natural and Woven Fibers

Organic fibers like linen or wool can add a touch of soft texture and color without overpowering a piece of furniture. Fabrics can have a vintage possibly historical feel, or be crisp clean and revive an interior with contemporary texture and color. This set of 4 chairs designed by Eva + Niles Koppel are an excellent melding of fabric and wood. 

This sofa designed by Grete Jalk for France + Daverkosen has been reupholstered in a Charcoal Grey Maharam Wool Felt for a modern, yet natural touch. The neutral tone can act as a ballast for the rest of the color story in your room while helping the natural beauty of the sofa's wooden frame shine.

These Chinese Mail Bags can lend a bit of refinement to your home's collection, signaling a connection between the eastern and western hemispheres with their French text. A beautifully preserved artifact with a strong history.

These Adrian Pearsall Wingback Chairs with Ottomans are one of our favorites. Reupholstered in fine linen, these historic pieces are one of Pearsall's best and stand up to the angular, sharp construction of contemporary furniture. Balancing its colors with a dark wooden frame and creamy fabric, this timeless furniture is a true collector's item. 

ART

Ceramic, metal, or paintings can also lend themselves to naturalistic environments. Unlimited by the constraints of furniture, artworks can accent and round out the overall feeling of your interior.

Works like Power Shoulder by Ruth Azuiss Migdal take a powerful, earthy form abstracted from the body.

Amanda Gentry's You Are Here takes more austere form, yet maintains the careful handmade qualities of ceramics.

William Eckhardt Kohler's Listening Bird is a vibrant rendering of idyllic fields. One part fantasy and one part nature.

Loosely Painted After: Black Lattice is Lynn Basa's investigation into decaying forms. A vaguely rusty or wooden section meets against organic black and cream forms. With an eye for foreground and background interplay, this simple abstraction is quiet enough to compliment rooms but elegant enough to capture your gaze.

Matthew Ryan
FEATURED IN MARCH

THE OVERGROWTH ON THE BANK BY SLATER SOUSLEY

The Overgrowth on the Bank displays Sousley’s skill of capturing light and creating movement in his work. Effortless brushstrokes and immaculate color choice compose mesmerizing scenes. Despite the movement, he manages a calmness and depth to his work that is unique. Leading a practice that translates sight to canvas, Sousley rarely sketches out his compositions before diving into the paint. Together these methods produce paintings of lush, impressionistic brushstrokes that reveal his cultivated intuition.

MOURO BY TOM JUDD

Focusing on the moment when architects were designing and building towards their visions of the future, Tom Judd’s paintings capture the uncompromising beauty of the grid. Harsh edges are greeted by curvaceous greenery. The solid surfaces of these buildings accept subtle hues of shade and light dictated by their adjacent walls or minimal roofs. The intricacies of these buildings are carefully rendered by Judd capturing a combination of their utopian elegance and bygone glory.

FURNITURE SET BY JENS RISOM FOR KNOLL

Risom initially used parachute webbing as a creative workaround during wartime material restrictions. This webbed design was the first of its kind, starting a revolution in how chairs could be made. By taking this strong webbing, bleaching it down to a neutral tone, then wrapping it around the chair’s frame; Risom innovated a way of creating long-lasting, attractive furniture from limited materials. In their original condition, this rare set of lounge and chaise lounge chairs with side tables is perfect for a collector seeking the authentic craftsmanship of these iconic pieces.

Matthew Ryan
FEATURED IN FEBRUARY

LURCH BY BAILEY FONTAINE

With a focus on its production, Bailey Fontaine designed Lurch as a different approach to the floor lamp. Lurch evokes the glow of hot glass while it is being blown, and the precarity of glassblowing itself, requiring balance at each point to make the glass come out correctly. Made from hand blown glass and brass, Lurch has a custom electrical cord which gives it an midcentury feel with a contemporary edge.
 

SET OF NORMAN CHERNER FOR PLYCRAFT DINING CHAIRS

Norman Cherner is known for utilizing postwar innovations in technology to design wooden furniture previously impossible. However, Cherner was not alone in the bentwood era. Ray and Charles Eames, George Nelson, and others were producing bentwood furniture of their own. Most designs, however, were fragile or relied on metal support structures to take the strain of a sitter’s weight. Cherner’s design stands out for its durability and elegance. Reupholstered in italian cowhide, these chairs offer a firm seat with a satiny feel. 

TIME BY CAMILLA TAYLOR

Camilla Taylor’s triptych entitled Time references both its accumulation of material and the process of making. Using offcuts of other works, Taylor adhered these pieces of paper in layers, much like the scales of fish. Her arrangement of color creates the illusion of a receding picture plane. This underscores the idea of objects receding from us in time. Featuring a subdued texture and color palette, Time is an artwork that would fit perfectly in most homes.

Matthew Ryan
ALL THINGS BLUE
 SET OF DUX DINING CHAIRS

SET OF DUX DINING CHAIRS

 JENS RISOM MODEL 37 SOFA

JENS RISOM MODEL 37 SOFA

  WORKING I  BY LINC THELEN

WORKING I BY LINC THELEN

  WORKING II  BY LINC THELEN

WORKING II BY LINC THELEN

 SET OF MILO BAUGHMAN OPEN BACK LOUNGE CHAIRS

SET OF MILO BAUGHMAN OPEN BACK LOUNGE CHAIRS

  WITHOUT WORDS  BY SARA PITTMAN

WITHOUT WORDS BY SARA PITTMAN

 SET OF ARNE JACOBSEN SWAN CHAIRS

SET OF ARNE JACOBSEN SWAN CHAIRS

 HANS WEGNER ROYAL BLUE ROCKER

HANS WEGNER ROYAL BLUE ROCKER

  SCATTERED FLOES  BY NICHOLAS KRIEFALL

SCATTERED FLOES BY NICHOLAS KRIEFALL

 DUX SOFA

DUX SOFA

 SET OF IB KOFOD-LARSEN LOUNGE CHAIRS

SET OF IB KOFOD-LARSEN LOUNGE CHAIRS

  NICHE  BY JEAN ALEXANDER FRATER

NICHE BY JEAN ALEXANDER FRATER

  NOTHING IS PERMANENT  BY JUDY COX

NOTHING IS PERMANENT BY JUDY COX

  PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS  BY JUDY COX

PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS BY JUDY COX

  LITTLE BLUE CABOOSE  BY JUDY COX

LITTLE BLUE CABOOSE BY JUDY COX

  SCALLOPS  BY LINC THELEN

SCALLOPS BY LINC THELEN

 LOUNGE CHAIR BY HOVMAND OLSEN

LOUNGE CHAIR BY HOVMAND OLSEN

Martha Morimoto