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CHICAGO VINTAGE 1980 BOXING PHOTOS

Phil Mascione’s dynamic composition draws your eye through the picture with the angled lines of the building’s walls. He has skillfully positioned the camera to include figures on each edge of this photograph. A musician warms up in the background, a distracted boxing coach has a conversation to the right, and a discerning spectator eyes the boxer for the far left. Each figure in this photograph draws you back to the subject, the boxer preparing for his match. In a striking way, Phil Mascione manages to convey the drama of the moment in one frame.

LAWRENCE PEABODY FOR RICHARDSON NEMSCHOFF SETTEE

The smooth forms of Lawrence Peabody are instantly recognizable. His rhythmic, elegant lines often give the feeling of a bend, rather than a curve. During his design career, Lawrence Peabody spent much of his time designing for the notable companies Kohler, Sears, Roebuck & Company, Richardson Brothers, and Boyd Lighting while also designing hotels in the US and Caribbean. However, his most refined, enduring work was made for the Richardson Nemschoff furniture company. This settee exemplifies Peabody’s ability to incorporate swooping, graceful curves into bold, well rounded design.

CENDESE "PULCINO" SCULPTURE

For this piece, Antonio da Ros worked with the Murano glass factory Ars Cendese. The factory itself is part of the rich glassmaking history of Murano. Glass production on Murano started over a millennium ago in 982. During the Renaissance, the production of new types of glass, most notably crystal clear glass, increased demand greatly. Subsequently, the skillfully crafted Murano glass was highly sought after by the upper class of Europe. The Murano glass factories survived the end of the Venetian Republic, starting a new push to develop the art of glasswork even further. Murano’s history of technical mastery in ornate, elegant colored glass shines in this Antonio da Ros sculpture.

Martha Morimoto